1

Why Are Honey Bees Disappearing?

Many people don’t realize this, but the global population of honey bees is at a record low. The primary reason for this decline has to do with pesticide accumulation inside the honey of bee hives. Pesticides are used so much in this day and age. In fact, there are billions of pounds of pesticides being sprayed all over the world each year. Farmers use them to keep insects off their crops and government officials use them to ward off mosquitoes. The problem is these pesticides are also killing honey bees, which are responsible for producing honey and pollinating flowers. Not only are pesticides linked to the death of these bees, they also cause bees to become disoriented with the inability to nurture their colonies.

According to researchers at the Department of Environmental Health of Harvard Chan School of Public Health, neonicotinoid pesticides are the cause of the sudden loss of honey bees throughout the entire planet. Researchers at the school analyzed 53 honey samples and 219 pollen samples that were extracted from 62 different hives in Massachusetts. These hives were taken from 10 of the state’s 14 counties in order to be diverse. The results of the analysis concluded that neonicotinoids were in both the honey and the pollen of each sample that was collected. This proves that neonicotinoids are not just in one particular location, but rather everywhere. These same conclusions were made by Canadian researchers who studied bees up in Ontario. The Canadian government is ready to take action by limiting the amount of pesticides that can be used throughout the province.

The simple solution to this entire problem is to stop using pesticides all together. There are already dozens of countries that have banned the use of pesticides on their crops and food. Unfortunately, the United States has not gotten to this point yet. The country has sustained its reputation for wanting the cheaper and most cost effective way of preserving crops.

Did You Know?

Without honeybees, human beings would lose 33% of the fruits and vegetables we eat. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has calculated that honeybees pollinate about 80% of our food crops. These crops are what give us apples, strawberries, broccoli, blueberries, nuts, cucumbers, asparagus and more. It also affects our beef and dairy supplies because cows won’t have enough alfalfa to eat, which is also pollinated by honeybees.

Comment(1)

  1. Reply
    Mark says

    I am thankful for your contribution to our sustainable living cause. Please continue to post these valuable researched inputs.

Post a comment